Ester’s Fair Prospect Bar Donates $2,500 to Love the Sea

When longtime San Francisco friends Jessica Everett and Suzanne Navarro decided to partner in Ester’s New Prospect, a tropical rum bar they opened on Wailuku’s Main Street in August 2020, they knew that they wanted to do something to contribute to the community. So, four…...
"
When longtime San Francisco friends Jessica Everett and Suzanne Navarro decided to partner in Ester’s New Prospect, a tropical rum bar they opened on Wailuku’s Main Street in August 2020, they knew that they wanted to do something to contribute to the community. So, four times in the past year and a half, the two have developed specialty cocktails for their menu and donated all proceeds from the fancy drinks to a nonprofit charity. “They blew me away,” said Campbell Farrell, founder and director of Love the Sea, a group dedicated to cleaning up debris on shorelines and beaches in Hawaiʻi–and the bar’s latest beneficiary. He expected a contribution of a few hundred bucks when the women offered to do a fundraiser for his group, so he was impressed when the donation totaled $2,500.
“It’s really cool,” said Farrell. “It makes you realize what a difference establishments like this can make when they make the effort.” Love the Sea’s most recent cleanup project last fall removed 5,700 pounds of debris from the Maui coastline stretching from Waiheʻe to Kahakuloa. Farrell’s goal is to collect 100,000 pounds of beach debris in 2022. Other groups who have benefitted from the bar’s generosity include the Special Olympics, the Hawaiʻi Animal Rescue Foundation, and Women Helping Women.

Dan Collins

A Whale of an Artist

A Whale of an Artist

Last March, a beached whale on the rocky shore of Kahului Harbor near Kanaloa Avenue captured the attention of visitors and local residents.

Broke Da Mout: June Edition

Broke Da Mout: June Edition

Conveyor Belt sushi is genius. Genki has actually taken the technology one step further and changed the conveyor belt to a bullet train that arrives at your table.

Limu: The Good, the Bad, and the Tasty

Limu: The Good, the Bad, and the Tasty

Whether you enjoy poke, sushi or ice cream—you already eat seaweed and seaweed-derived products. Locally known as limu or ogo, these marine algae are vital to the environment, culturally important, and have serious economic value.